EXPLORE THE FACTS

  • Deaths
    Deaths
  • Effects
    Effects
  • Addiction
    Addiction
  • Marketing
    Marketing
  • Chemicals
    Chemicals
  • Hookah
    Hookah
  • Smokeless
    Smokeless
  • Vaping
    Vaping

Tobacco kills a smoker every
6
seconds worldwide.

SOURCE: “Tobacco Fact Sheet.” World Health Organization, World Health Organization, May 2017, www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs339/en/.

Tobacco kills a smoker every
6
seconds worldwide.

SOURCE: “Tobacco Fact Sheet.” World Health Organization, World Health Organization, May 2017, www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs339/en/.

Tobacco kills 1,300 people every day in the U.S.

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014.

Tobacco kills 1,300 people every day in the U.S.

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014.

More people die from cigarettes in an hour than from shark attacks in a whole year.

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014. “World Locations with Highest Attack Rates.” World   Locations with Highest Attack Rates :: Florida Museum of Natural History, www.floridamuseum.ufl.edu/fish/isaf/shark-attacks-maps-data/trends/world-highest-attacks/.

Secondhand smoke
kills 41,000 nonsmokers a year in the U.S.

Like nana.

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014

Secondhand smoke
kills 41,000 nonsmokers a year in the U.S.

Like nana.

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014

Amount of smokers that have died since you’ve been on this page.


SOURCE: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014

Tobacco kills
1 in 2
long-term smokers.

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014 [accessed 2017 Apr 20].

SMOKING 1 -10 Cigarettes a day increases your odds of dying by 87%.

SOURCE: Inoue-Choi M, Liao L, Reyes-Guzman C, Hartge P, Caporaso N, Freedman N. Association of longterm low-intensity smoking with all-cause and causes pecific mortality in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. JAMA Internal Medicine. December 5, 2016.

SMOKING 1 -10 Cigarettes a day increases your odds of dying by 87%.

SOURCE: Inoue-Choi M, Liao L, Reyes-Guzman C, Hartge P, Caporaso N, Freedman N. Association of longterm low-intensity smoking with all-cause and causes pecific mortality in the NIH-AARP Diet and Health Study. JAMA Internal Medicine. December 5, 2016.

Being in a car with a smoker increases your chances of dying even if you’re not smoking.

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease: The Biology and Behavioral Basis for Smoking-Attributable Disease: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2010.

Being in a car with a smoker increases your chances of dying even if you’re not smoking.

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease: The Biology and Behavioral Basis for Smoking-Attributable Disease: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2010.

480,000 smokers’ health bars go down to zero every year.

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014.

9 out 10 smokers start before the age of 18, which leads to premature death.

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2014). The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health

How many deaths is tobacco responsible for since 1964?

SOURCE: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking —50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014.

In the U.S., tobacco kills more people than car accidents, alcohol, illegal drugs and murders —combined.

SOURCE: Mokdad AH, Marks JS, Stroup DF, Gerberding JL. Actual Causes of Death in the United States. JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association 2004;291(10):1238–45 [cited 2017 Apr 20].

Which of the following has the best odds?

SOURCE: Shaw, Mary, Richard Mitchell, and Danny Dorling. "Time for a Smoke? One Cigarette Reduces Your Life by 11 Minutes." BMJ : British Medical Journal. British Medical Journal, 2000. Web. 30 June 2016.

EXPLORE THE FACTS

  • Deaths
    Deaths
  • Effects
    Effects
  • Addiction
    Addiction
  • Marketing
    Marketing
  • Chemicals
    Chemicals
  • Hookah
    Hookah
  • Smokeless
    Smokeless
  • Vaping
    Vaping